A decision from the EPA is expected sometime this year regarding the possible cleanup of a long standing hazardous waste site in Beavercreek. The site is located at the corner of Grange Hall and Patterson Roads.


Hazardous Waste Site May Get Attention This Year.
The fenced in property on the corner of Grange Hall and Patterson Roads in Beavercreek listed on the National Priorities List of EPA Superfund sites for cleanup. Photo © C. Barhorst

Residents know the corner as a strange looking fenced in vacant lot with odd well caps visible beyond the fence line. The site was once the location of the Lammers Barrel Factory which dealt in the disposal of hazardous chemicals. In 1969 the Lammers Barrel Factory was the scene of a huge fire that dumped thousands of gallons of chemical waste into the Little Beaver Creek and contaminated the ground soil.

The site has long been considered a problem and in 2002 the US EPA recommended it be added to National Priorities List, also referred to as the EPA Superfund list. The site was added in 2003.

Local residents and environmentalists are anxiously awaiting a decision this year regarding a possible cleanup of the site. Last year the EPA announced they were exploring options for a cleanup of the site and would announce plans in 2008.


Testing Efforts in 2007.
EPA testing efforts that were seen at the site in early 2007. This photo was taken January 20, 2007. Photo © C. Barhorst

Many environmentalists are concerned about the Little Beaver Creek, which runs through the site and is in the contamination zone. Residents are also concerned, particularly those homes located in the northern part of the Valleywood residential neighborhood, many of which also lie in the contamination zone. In 2000 and 2001, an investigation by the Army Corps of Engineers indicated that the extent of contamination still present at the site was more extensive than originally anticipated. The Army Corps of Engineers was investigating what measures would be needed for a clean up of the site.

No official decision has been announced yet by the EPA, but many hope some news will come soon about what will be done to clean up this hazardous waste site in Beavercreek.

For more information about this story read the additional articles below:
The 1969 Fire at the Lammers Barrel Factory and Hazardous Contamination Found in Beavercreek Neighborhood.





Lammer’s Barrel Factory
Fire, 1969.
Image from US
EPA. Photo by Don Reed

The 1969 Fire at the Lammers Barrel Factory

In 1969 a fire broke out at the Lammers Barrel Factory, also known as the Kohnen and Lammars Chemical Company, which once occupied 2 acres of land on the corner of Grange Hall and Patterson Road. The property at that time was in what was then Beavercreek Township.

The fire completely destroyed the buildings. All that remains now is a concrete pad and pipes that apparently ran from the former facility into the Little Beaver Creek.

Operations began at Lammers Barrel Factory in 1953 and continued until the fire in October 1969. According to former employees, the facility bought, sold and reclaimed all types of solvents.

During operation, the facility had an above-ground storage capacity of over 500,000 gallons of chemical solvents. Any inventories of chemicals handled at the facility were reportedly destroyed in the fire.


The Site of the Lammers Barrel Factory Today
All that remains now is a concrete pad and pipes that apparently ran from the former facility into the Little Beaver Creek. Photo © Craig Barhorst

Chemical solvents stored at the facility included trichloroethylene, methyl-ethyl ketone, tetrachloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, ketones, esters, and alcohols. The site had eighteen vertical tanks, ranging in size from 2,500 to 25,000 gallons and approximately 6,000 55-gallon drums.



Hazardous Contamination Found in Beavercreek Neighborhood

In 1969 a huge chemical fire at the Lammers Barrel Factory in Beavercreek dumped thousands of gallons of toxic chemicals into the Little Beaver Creek and contaminated the ground soil. The property is located at the corner of Grange Hall and Patterson Roads.

Serious concerns about contamination around the site arose in the mid 1980’s when local residents and the Ohio EPA initiated testing of residential wells. In 1985 about 90 residential wells in the northern end of the Valleywood subdivision, located southeast of the facility, revealed the presence of vinyl chloride above the federal maximum contaminant levels. Several wells also contained other volatile organic compounds, such as chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethene, perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene.

The problem was considered so bad in 1985 that the Ohio National Guard brought a 350-gallon mobile water tank as an emergency water supply for five homes along Patterson Road. Nine other homes that exceeded acceptable levels were subsequently connected to the county water system.


The Site and Extent of Contamination
The site lies on the corner of Grange Hall and Patterson Roads. Well water contamination was found in many of the homes in the Valleywood subdivision.Photo USGS

In 1992, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency conducted a site inspection. Six soil samples, four sediment and four surface water samples from Little Beaver Creek were collected along with additional residential well samples. The six soil samples from the site indicated high concentrations of volatile chemicals, lead and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Analysis of the creek sediment samples also revealed the presence of xylenes and heavy metals.

Periodic ground water testing continued and the extension of the county water line or installation of filtration systems occurred in several homes. In 1997 testing showed that the contaminated ground water plume had advanced further than the Valleywood subdivision. Additional investigation showed that ground water contamination extended from the site outward to the east, south, and southeast and also impacted an area along the northern end of the Woodhaven subdivision.

In 2000 and 2001, the Army Corps of Engineers conducted a Hydrogeologic Investigation to look at contaminant removal at the site. Results indicated that the extent of contamination still present at the site was more extensive than originally anticipated. County water lines were extended to four additional homes in 2000.

In September 2002, U.S. EPA proposed that the Lammers Barrel Factory site be added to the National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites, also referred to as the EPA Superfund list. Additional testing occurred from 2003 through 2007 and a recommendation for a cleanup plan is expected in 2008.

Source: US Environmental Protection Agency. br20080204-01

Note: An earlier version of this story ran with an error. An EPA study from 1997 was erronously listed at EPA’s website as being dated January 30, 2008. The previous article reported on the conclusion of that study, which recommended against Superfund involvement, as being new information. We caught the error while verifying the accuracy of the story and immediately corrected the story 4 hours after it’s original posting. We appologize for the error.